CGC Elm works with a full deck

Crewmembers aboard Coast Guard Cutter Elm, a 225-foot buoy tender homeported in Fort Macon, N.C., service an aid to navigation in the entrance of the Cape Fear River, April 19, 2011. Crewmembers on the Elm relocated twelve buoys at Oregon Inlet and Beaufort Inlet in the time span of a week to improve navigational safety and efficiency through the channels impacted by extensive shoaling. U.S. Coast Guard photo.

Crewmembers aboard Coast Guard Cutter Elm, a 225-foot buoy tender homeported in Fort Macon, N.C., service an aid to navigation in the entrance of the Cape Fear River, April 19, 2011. Crewmembers on the Elm relocated twelve buoys at Oregon Inlet and Beaufort Inlet in the time span of a week to improve navigational safety and efficiency through the channels impacted by extensive shoaling. U.S. Coast Guard photo.

Last week, crewmembers aboard Coast Guard Cutter Elm serviced an aid to navigation in the entrance of the Cape Fear River in North Carolina. The crew relocated 12 buoys at Oregon Inlet and Beaufort Inlet in the time span of a week to improve navigational safety and efficiency through the channels impacted by extensive shoaling. The 225-foot Elm, homeported in Fort Macon, is one of 16 seagoing buoy tenders.

Seagoing buoy tenders are some of the newest cutters in the Coast Guard fleet intended to replace the World War II era 180-foot buoy tenders. They are equipped with a single controllable pitch propeller and bow and stern thrusters to give the cutter the maneuverability it needs to tend buoys offshore and in restricted waters. A dynamic positioning system can hold the vessel within a 10-meter circle using the global positioning system allowing the crew to service and position floating aids to navigation more efficiently.

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